15 Dec
2014
Gift Guide—The Kitchen Gardener Edition

Gardener Gift Guide 2014 — The Kitchen Edition

Last week, I shared some of my favorite books and gardening tools in two separate gift guides for gardeners. This week, we move on to the harvest, and what to do with it. We vegetables gardeners grow vegetables because we love to garden, and also—presumably—because we love to eat our […] ...

Read the full article →
4 Dec
2014
Gift Guide — 10 Tools for Gardeners

Gardener Gift Guide 2014 — The Tools Edition

Two days ago, we talked books. Today, the gift guide is all about tools and other useful things that your garden-loving giftee will want to put to work in the garden. Several of these items I’ve given as gifts, and others I’ve “gifted” to myself. All are well-built for a long […] ...

Read the full article →
2 Dec
2014
Gift Guide — 10 Books for Gardeners

Gardener Gift Guide 2014 — The Books Edition

Can you believe today is December 2? Me neither. Seems like the holidays always manage to sneak up on me. You’d think 365 days’ advance notice would be enough, but, nope. For all you wait-until-December shoppers out there (yep, that’d be me), I’ll be posting a few garden-friendly gift guides […] ...

Read the full article →
25 Nov
2014
2015 Outlaw Garden Wall Calendar

The Outlaw Garden 2015 Wall Calendar

I am SO excited to be sharing this with y’all! After weeks of edits and revisions, the Outlaw Garden 2015 wall calendar is done and ready for you. I hope y’all like it! You can view and buy the calendar on lulu.com. Each month features a full-color photo of a […] ...

Read the full article →
24 Nov
2014
Seed Catalog Round-Up — 9 to Try

9 Seed Catalogs to Request Today

I’m picky when it comes to seeds: They should be healthy and disease-free; ideally heirloom and organic; and, with few exceptions, open pollinated (meaning, not hybrids). I’m also picky when it comes to seed catalogs. I look for companies that specialize in organic, open-pollinated, and/or heirloom seeds. Because unusual varieties […] ...

Read the full article →
9 Oct
2014
five fall bloomers for the front yard vegetable garden

Five Fall-Blooming Plants for the Front Yard Vegetable Garden (or any garden)

Late summer and fall can bring a somewhat exhausted look to the garden. The tomatoes and squash often bear the ravages of mildews, blights, and other foliage ills. The kales and chards may be reduce to leaf ribs and stalks by hungry hungry cabbage worms. And, seemingly overnight, a rush of […] ...

Read the full article →
1 Oct
2014
garlic in the landscape

Garlic in the Landscape

We typically think of fall as the time for harvesting our gardens, but some crops fare best when planted in these cool days between the heat of the summer and the onset of winter. Of those, garlic is perhaps the best known and most beloved. It’s also — at least […] ...

Read the full article →
11 Sep
2014
blame ragweed for your fall allergies

Blame Ragweed (Not Goldenrod) for Your Fall Allergies

Got hay fever? Me too. For a couple weeks now I’ve been waking the dog with house-shaking sneezes. I’m not leaking from the eyes or nose, and I don’t need to carry a box of tissues everywhere I go, but I can say with certainty that the fall allergy season […] ...

Read the full article →
23 Jul
2014
eviction

Save this Garden!

Three days ago, I got an email from a California gardener. Let’s call her “Sue.” (Not her real name.) Sue grows eggplants, tomatoes, squash, corn, and more. She has cucumber vines climbing a trellis and herbs mixed in with flowers. Since she lives in southern California, Sue is concerned about excess water […] ...

Read the full article →
27 Jun
2014
Summer Sprinters: Five fast-growing veggies for mid-summer sowing

Five Fast-Growing Veggies to Plant Now

m4s0n501 It’s late June, and I haven’t planted a single summer squash yet. True story. Partially, this is an effort to starve out the squash bugs that settled in much-too-happily last year. I’ve read that starting squash late can help with these pests, because they emerge earlier and move on […] ...

Read the full article →